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IN THE NEWS

PROGRAM WILL HELP LOCAL POLICE

BETTER IDENTIFY AUTISTIC CHILDREN

North Township and Autism Speaks are working to provide training for police to better identify and relate to children with autism in order to keep them safe.


At the same time, the township is working with families with children who have the disorder to provide fun bracelets that will be an easy identifier.


The program will begin with East Chicago Police and eventually include all agencies in North Township. East Chicago officials have identified 180 special needs families that could benefit from the training. Township Trustee Frank Mrvan credits Assistant Chief Deputy Gilda Orange for starting the program.


The mother of a police officer and an autistic grandson, Orange said she just happened to be in the right place to learn about the training.


“If you didn’t know better, you wouldn’t know my grandson is autistic,” Orange said. “Because he doesn’t process thoughts and emotions like other kids, untrained police might think he is exhibiting dangerous behaviors when he isn’t. This training will help protect Justin and hundreds of others like him.”


NORTH TOWNSHIP STUDENTS GET
​​​​​​​HANDS-ON LESSON IN GOVERNMENT

In an effort to bring government even closer to the people, North Township Trustee Frank Mrvan is taking his office and the township’s governing board on tour. Since the first class at Hammond’s Morton High, Mrvan is seeing a growing interest in local government – how it works and why it’s important.


“These students are the next leaders of our region – and our country,” he said. “Our goal is to show young people public service in action.”


The inaugural visit was so successful, Mrvan took the initiative even further – and is conducting township board meetings at local high schools.


“Most students never imagine that township government is a safety net for people living at the margins. Now, they see why it’s important.”